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One path is to do the bare minimum

Your boss does not appreciate you, or is there a glass ceiling in your company or your department? Or are your clients always trying to pay less?

The solution? One is to do the bare minimum required not to get fired. Or, if you work for clients, do the bare minimum to meet spec. That’s an effective use of your time, right? 

Except, it isn’t. 

It is a race to the bottom. And eventually, you will win. 

You cannot control what your boss thinks of you. Or how the company is structured. Or how your clients see your work. 

That leaves you with the only thing you can control: your attitude. 

Doing the bare minimum, just getting by, it is a victim attitude. It is a way for you to get “revenge” on the outside circumstances that don’t reward you. 

So what is the alternative? 

The alternative is to choose to grow. To choose to be focused, to do outstanding work, work that you are proud of, and you would happily brag about at your next job interview or in the sales call with your prospects. 

Will your current boss suddenly appreciate you? 

I would say that is the wrong question. Yes, we do crave appreciation and being seen for what we are, but it starts with yourself. Appreciate yourself first. And one way to do that is to create yourself every day in the person you want to be, regardless of how those around you see you. As you get better at this, you will think differently, you will see new opportunities, you will have the energy to act on them, and your circumstances will change. 

Stay focused

All the productivity gurus and spiritual gurus talk about the power of being focused. And for a good reason. Scrolling through your social media feed scatters your mind. Juggling too many projects increase the task-switching costs. Chasing too many topics does not allow you to go deep on any of them. 

Create the discipline of staying focused. Even if you don’t like your current job, stay focused. It builds a skill that will be priceless in all areas of your life. 

Staying focused also means choosing not to indulge in fear and doubt and worry. Choose courageous thoughts; choose creative thoughts. 

A side note about becoming a martyr 

That is not what I am suggesting in this article. I am not talking about self-sacrifice; instead, I am suggesting getting out of self-pity and allowing outside circumstances to determine your inner feelings and how you show up in the world. 

Ask powerful questions like:

  • what is needed from me at this moment?
  • how can I help in this situation?
  • whom can I connect? 
  • how can I better at this?
  • what is truly important now? 
  • how can I be generous today?
  • is what I am doing, and thinking serve my short and long-term goals? 

Just Quit!

Or better yet, don’t even start!

Quitting has a bad reputation, but it can be one of the best decisions you can make. 

As children, and later as students, we were often being told to “not be lazy”, and people who are busy or hard-working are applauded. 

But this advice is flawed in a subtle but dramatic way. Busy work is not the same as focused work. It is entirely possible to be busy all day and not accomplishing anything of importance.

The way we were taught in school was in 50 minutes blocks of something, and then we would be interrupted to do something else. 

The logic, they say, is that children get bored with one subject, and this switching adds diversity to the school day. But what it actually does is prevents anyone from going deep on any one topic. 

We carry this habit of “multi-tasking” into our adult life, and working on multiple projects at a time, doing a tiny bit of each day. 

I used to think that doing multi-tasking, I was productive, but I was just busy.

The Cost of Task Switching

This cost became extremely obvious to me when working on complex software projects. Just getting into the context of thinking where I left off would take up most of the hour, and then I’d have to switch to something else. My mind got an excellent workout, but my output grew at snail speed. 

Repeated task switching does not allow you to go deep and to build expertise. And it costs you time that will add up. It is a perfect recipe to become and stay average

The solution is to quit! Or better yet, don’t even start! 

If you don’t have it in you to finish this project or become the best at what you do, quit and choose something else. Don’t quit soon, quit now. Ignore the sunk costs: “but I’ve already invested so much in this!”

Quit, but quit strategically. Don’t become a serial quitter. Instead, quit so that you can focus on the projects you want and can finish. So you have the time and energy to become the best in the world at what you do. 

Quitting is especially important if you find yourself on a dead-end path. A dead-end path is different from a plateau. A plateau can be overcome; a dead-end cannot. Every second you stay on a dead-end path is a second wasted that could be spent on the other path, which would get you more fulfillment and personal growth. 

Dead-end paths could be a business that is now obsolete and dying, a job where you’ve become stuck in a rut, a project that is not moving forward despite your best efforts, or a relationship with no potential for growth. 

A quick aside about “The best in the world.”

Becoming the “best in the world” can feel very challenging until you realize that “the best in the world” does not mean “the best on the planet”. You get to choose and define your world, your market, the people you would like to delight, to be “the best” for. And you can grow from there. 

I will end with a quote from the book that inspired this article:

“Quit the wrong stuff.
Stick with the right stuff.
Have the guts to do one or the other.”

The Dip – by Seth Godin